Monthly Archives: June 2010

Is Rewards Checking for You?

When you put money in the bank, the bank takes that money and lends it out to others, charging interest. The money you put into a savings account or CD earns interest for you, but it is a low rate of interest — one that is low enough that the difference between what the bank is paying you to keep the money, and the what the bank is getting for lending it out, results in a profit. Cash products come with low rates of return anyway because, for the most part, they are very low risk, guaranteeing that you get back what you put in (minus any applicable penalties and fees, of course).>>> [Read More]

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RBC Bank Online Banking

Here at Peak Personal Finance, we often look at how online banking systems stack up. We know that in today’s world, our busy lives depend on conveniences that help us speed up otherwise mundane tasks like banking. Today, we’re looking at the online banking at RBC Bank to see how it looks.>>> [Read More]

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RBC Bank CD Rates

Here at Peak Personal Finance, we look at every aspect of your personal finances that we can. One of those is saving for the future – whether it be to stabilize another risky investment or to save for a specific reason or event. Certificate of deposit accounts are popular for both of those, because they are a stable, guaranteed investment with an account backed by the FDIC. One of our readers recently asked us our opinion of RBC Bank and how RBC CD rates stack up. >>> [Read More]

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Should You Do Work for Friends and Family?

When you own your own business, or provide a service, it seems almost natural that your friends and family would come to you for advice. As a freelancer, I am frequently asked for help on a number of items. And, while I am willing to read over school essays for my siblings, or help a friend with his graduate school application, I am rarely willing to do work for hire for friends and family.>>> [Read More]

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